Our Mission

The Team Drea Foundation supports bold, innovative research to find a cure or effective treatment for ALS.

We see raising awareness about this devastating disease as an opportunity to inspire people to live bravely, love joyfully, and appreciate the gift of life.

Our Founder

Andrea Lytle Peet was diagnosed with ALS in 2014 at the age of 33. In eight months, she went from completing a 70.3-mile half Ironman triathlon to walking with a cane.

Remarkably, she has continued to participate in races. Since diagnosis, she has completed 35+ marathons, half marathons or triathlons on her recumbent trike. Her new goal is to complete a marathon in all 50 states.

Go On, Be Brave. Make A World Without ALS

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Athletes
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States + Canada, and the U.K
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Donations Raised

17 hours ago

Team Drea Foundation
Marathon #31 (MA)…abandoned 🤦‍♀️🤪 Well, 70+ races and my first DNF (Did Not Finish). @mainlymarathons had to scramble to find another venue due to covid, and unfortunately, this one had a HILL and then a HILL (see second pic). Unfortunately, I would have had to do the hill another 11 times 😣 Maybe if this was my only race this week, but it was supposed to the first of 4 marathons in a row (MA-VT-NH-ME-🤪)…so I decided not to push it. So I need another marathon in Massachusetts…hmmm 🤔.So I’m disappointed, obviously, but it’ll be okay. Trying to #goonbebrave and live to trike another day…like tomorrow, in VT 😉💚 ...
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5 days ago

Team Drea Foundation
Team Drea Foundation's cover photo ...
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5 days ago

Team Drea Foundation
Happy birthday to the one who makes each day better, who makes me laugh til I snort, who lifts me up and keeps me upright, and who shows me every day how lucky I truly am 💕 @42ndstoysterbar ...
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About ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (aka ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease) is a progressive neurological disease that affects the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. When motor neurons that connect nerves and muscles die, people lose the ability to initiate and control muscle movement. Without stimulation, muscles become weak and atrophy. Most people with ALS become totally paralyzed as they lose the ability to walk, talk, eat, swallow, and breathe.

Every 90 minutes, someone with ALS dies and another person is diagnosed.

The average age of diagnosis is 55; however, cases of ALS also appear in people in their 20s and 30s.

Military veterans are twice as likely to develop ALS as the general population. Athletes also seem to be more susceptible. No one is sure why.

The average life expectancy of a person with ALS is 2-5 years. 20% live 5 years or more; 10% percent live more than 10 years.

The only approved drug for ALS (riluzole), only extends life expectancy by 2-3 months.

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